THE LIFE INSURANCE RETIREMENT PLAN – REPORT (LIRP)

 

At American Financial Literacy Institute we’re always looking for ways to better educate our people. In particular, we created a report called the Life Insurance Retirement Plan. In this report we compare some of the differences of using life insurance as a retirement planning alternative unlike a traditional 401k or something of this nature. In particular with Life Insurance, we get some benefits that we don’t get in a traditional 4o1k or IRA. In particular, we can have tax free distributions on the back end, meaning that when the money comes out we don’t pay taxes. Unlike a 401k or IRA, we have to pay taxes on the back end, we don’t get a tax deduction upfront, but we do get the ability to have the money grow tax deferred and then have it come out tax free so it could be a really powerful story. The other thing we talk about is how Life Insurance; the investment component of it can be done in an indexing type concept. What do I mean by indexing? In particular, it’s a strategy that allows you to target the SMP 500 or a multi-asset index (there is many different investment options). As you invest in this, you don’t get 100% of the upside, but what you get is none of the downside. Meaning that if the market dropped five or ten percent, you would get zero. We joke and say “zero is your hero”. But over the last ten or fifteen years, this would’ve been a very powerful way for you to invest, protecting yourself, and actually outperforming a traditional buy and hold type strategy. On the back of this report, we explore specific examples of using a $10,000 contribution to your 401k every year, comparing that to a $10,000 contribution to a Life Insurance plan. While you do get a tax savings upfront with the 401k, because you get a tax deduction, when the money is growing in the 401k, you pay taxes coming out. With the Life Insurance example, you don’t get the tax deduction upfront, but what you do get is the money coming out tax-free! This can be a huge difference in the way of returns. In a traditional 401k, using a 7.5% growth rate (Warren Buffet cited from 1950-2011). That money would’ve grown to $268,000, meaning $10,000 a year for 15 years, $150k worth of contributions, at 7.5% would’ve grown to $268,000. And we show you using that how the money in a traditional 401k would come out. You have to pay taxes on that money so we assume a 25% tax bracket coming out with the 401k, and we notice that over that time of getting income. If we do a 30 year time horizon, you basically are going to pay over $150k in taxes while that money has been coming out of your traditional 401k. With the Life Insurance, again, we don’t get that tax deduction upfront, but we get the tax-free distributions on the back end. What that means is the $150k of taxes that you would’ve paid, you don’t pay that with the Life Insurance. The nice thing too is that as it’s coming out of the Life Insurance, it doesn’t effect your social security taxes. Unfortunately, most people don’t realize that potentially much as 50 to 85% of your social security could be taxed in retirement, depending on how much income they make. With the Life Insurance Retirement Plan, you don’t have that. The other thing is that it doesn’t effect your Medicare B Premiums. The last concept that we talked about with the report is taxes. Where are we currently in taxes? You’re not going to believe this, but we are in the lowest tax environments we’ve been in for the last 70-80 years. Most people feel with a budget out of control and the big deficits that we’re facing that taxes have to go up over the long run, so the argument can be made that deferring today to potentially pay taxes down the road at maybe a higher tax bracket isn’t going to make as much sense as you think it is. So if you think that taxes are going to go up, a Life Insurance Retirement Strategy might make more sense to you. It’s our job to educate you as to what is out there, this might be a piece to a portfolio, there are great reasons to have a 401k like potentially a company match. There’s also great reasons to maybe have some money in a Life Insurance Retirement Strategy.

 

 

**ACCESS THE REPORT HERE**
http://aflinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/AFLI-LIRP.pdf

AFLI | UNDERSTANDING YOUR MONEY

 

AFLI’s Mission is empower people to take better control of their financial lives. We do this through educational workshops giving unbiased informative information and ongoing content and materials. According to various studies as many as 90 percent of American’s site financial stress as the number one concern in their lives. In our four building blocks to financial wellness program we focus on understanding your money, solving the insurance maze, investing 101, and retirement planning basics. Block one, understanding your money, focuses on building a sound financial foundation and discusses how to maximize lifetime earnings, the importance of budgeting, managing your debt, having an emergency cash fund, and the power of goal setting and savings. By partnering with companies, organizations, and municipalities, AFLI is committed to reducing financial stress and giving people the tools they need to feel good about making decisions with their money!

 

 

WATCH THE VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXIb0S44hag

 

To Request a Block 1 booklet for FREE, please email info@aflinstitute.org

HEALTHCARE: HEART ATTACKS

Heart Attacks

 

Sometimes referred to as the “silent killer,” heart disease is officially the leading cause of death, claiming over 700,000 people a year.  A single EKG’s and MRI can cost over $5,000, hospital stays can average over $20,000, angiograms can be as much as $30,000, and a heart bypass can cost over $70,000. Drugs can be very expensive, not to mention rehabilitation and ongoing maintenance.  The CDC Foundation estimates that we spend over one billion dollars a day treating heart disease and strokes, with one out of every six healthcare dollars spent on heart care.  The U.S. spends more on healthcare than any other country, estimated by CNBC to total over $3.4 trillion dollars a year with an average of over $10,345 per person.

 

Over 155 million people are covered under an employer sponsored heath insurance plan.   However, the Kaiser Family Foundation reported that over 27 million Americans don’t have health insurance, with the Hispanic community making up the largest demographic without insurance.  The leading reason that people don’t have health coverage is that it was unaffordable, and with healthcare costs continue to increase at alarming rates, it will only become more prohibitive.

WASTING MONEY

We need to spend our money on brand-name products because those are the best.  Don’t automatically assume that higher quality means more money, because there are plenty of examples of good quality with lower prices.  We often waste money buying only brand-names, but brand name products aren’t necessarily better, or worth the higher prices.  There are countless examples of different products that provide a great alternative to higher priced name brands.  For example, grocery store brands are a terrific example of how we can save money without having to buy the name brand.  Ironically, many store brands are identical, but you are paying more for the name brand.  Heinz ketchup costs more than Walmart’s ketchup brand, or Safeway’s Home brand paper towels vs. the higher cost Brawny paper towels.  We also see a lot of brands in the clothing business, but does that mean that a Hanes tee shirt is better than a Target brand tee shirt? Probably not–but you are going to end up paying a lot more for that Hanes label.  Remember that just because one brand spends a lot of money on advertising, doesn’t mean that they must be better than a lesser known brand.  A great way to cut costs is to look for brand name alternatives, things that are on sale, or any promotions where a company provides great savings on their brand.  How many times have you gone to the store, and the store brand is less expensive than the name brands? They are trying to create product awareness, and we benefit from the savings.

EMERGENCY CASH FUND

Besides budgeting, debt management, and educating ourselves on “understanding our money,” having an emergency cash fund is the first place to start saving money.  The temptation may be to invest in the stock market,  or invest in your company’s retirement plan–but the emergency fund is arguably the most important piece of getting your finances in order.  An account that is used to stave off unplanned expenses that can often cause financial turmoil. When we have some money put away for a “rainy day” or to handle unexpected financial curve balls, it provides a safety net and peace-of-mind. The money should be readily available and safe to be used specifically for emergencies, i.e. an emergency fund.  How much we put away really depends on us, what we can afford, and what’s sufficient to cover our expenses for a period of time.  A good rule of thumb is to have 3 to 6 months of expenses set aside.   Obviously, if we have unpredictable income, such as commissions, seasonal income, concerns about our employment, a lay-off, or possible job change, then we may want more.  Also, if we are having health concerns or potential needs with other loved ones, consider that as well.  There are no set rules, but the goal is to make the unpredictable expenses more predictable, and feeling less stressed. Ideally, this money should be in a safe, accessible place, such as a savings account, money market, or in 3-month T-Bills.  Most mutual fund companies have a money market option available, but beware of any service fees that may be charged if we don’t maintain a proper account balance.   Unfortunately, there are also many examples where people get into a financial bind, and take a loan from their retirement 401(k) as their emergency fund.  This isn’t what the retirement monies are to be used for, because they can come with potential fees and penalties, income tax consequences and are supposed to be earmarked for long-term retirement needs.
A couple of examples may help further illustrate: If our monthly budget totals roughly $2,100, then we should shoot for having about $6,300 in an emergency fund.  Also, in this same example, let’s say that we have a leaky roof that needs about $1,700 to fix. Then our emergency fund should be $8,000, ($6,300 + $1,700).
As with any saving’s goal, getting started and sticking with it is the best plan for success. Having an emergency fund gives us flexibility and reduces stress.