$1.6 billion reasons to be careful

Here’s a question? What has a 70% bankruptcy rate with 44% of people spending all the money within 5 years….that’s right “winning the lottery!” National Endowment for Financial Education

Now in the true confessions department, I admit to playing the Powerball or Mega Millions sometimes when it gets above $200 million. Candidly, I have found myself daydreaming of what I would do with the money if I won. I further justified my lottery purchasing by feeling good that my $4 investment in (2) $2 tickets, ultimately benefits education or charitable causes! Hey, at least it sounds good!!

It’s easy to see why people play because the largest Powerball ever won was $1.6 Billion, which was split 3-ways at $528.8. The largest Megamillions was $656 million for a lump sum pay-out of $474 million. You could do a lot of great things with all that money.

However, I quickly come back down to earth realizing that the odds of winning a jackpot lottery are 1 in 195,249,054, or to quote line from the movie Dumb and Dummier, “what you are saying is that I have a chance?” So with the population over 300 million, you basically have 2/3’s of the entire population competing against you. Lightening hitting me is greater!

Then, it’s starts to get very scary when you realize that 21% of people feel that the only way they can afford to retire is winning the lottery. Or that recent data has suggested that many more people are turning to the Lottery for their financial solutions  Consider this:

The average Lottery regular spends $206 annually, which at:

5%= $36,623.60

7%= $67,870.22

10%= $179,626.92

This is especially enlightening when you consider that roughly half of Americans have nothing saved for retirement, or a Forbes report claiming that roughly 2/3’s of people couldn’t put their hands of $500 for an emergency! So, rather than dropping money on Lottery tickets consistently, consider these sure-fire ways to financially get ahead:

  • Pay Down credit card debt, you get guaranteed savings on interest charges
  • Put money in a 401(k) retirement plan, especially if your employer matches
  • Add money to your mortgage payments against principal to save mortgage interest
  • Invest in a mutual fund or stock dividend reinvestment plan
  • Put the money aside for a rainy day or emergency
  • Donate it to charity and feel good!

Buying lottery tickets once awhile isn’t the end of the world unless you really need the money. It’s a game and it’s about playing for fun, not out of financial necessity. It’s doesn’t solve financial problems because according to the National Endowment for Financial Education, 70% of Lottery winners are right back to where they were 5 years later..that’s not financial security!

THE LIFE INSURANCE RETIREMENT PLAN – REPORT (LIRP)

 

At American Financial Literacy Institute we’re always looking for ways to better educate our people. In particular, we created a report called the Life Insurance Retirement Plan. In this report we compare some of the differences of using life insurance as a retirement planning alternative unlike a traditional 401k or something of this nature. In particular with Life Insurance, we get some benefits that we don’t get in a traditional 4o1k or IRA. In particular, we can have tax free distributions on the back end, meaning that when the money comes out we don’t pay taxes. Unlike a 401k or IRA, we have to pay taxes on the back end, we don’t get a tax deduction upfront, but we do get the ability to have the money grow tax deferred and then have it come out tax free so it could be a really powerful story. The other thing we talk about is how Life Insurance; the investment component of it can be done in an indexing type concept. What do I mean by indexing? In particular, it’s a strategy that allows you to target the SMP 500 or a multi-asset index (there is many different investment options). As you invest in this, you don’t get 100% of the upside, but what you get is none of the downside. Meaning that if the market dropped five or ten percent, you would get zero. We joke and say “zero is your hero”. But over the last ten or fifteen years, this would’ve been a very powerful way for you to invest, protecting yourself, and actually outperforming a traditional buy and hold type strategy. On the back of this report, we explore specific examples of using a $10,000 contribution to your 401k every year, comparing that to a $10,000 contribution to a Life Insurance plan. While you do get a tax savings upfront with the 401k, because you get a tax deduction, when the money is growing in the 401k, you pay taxes coming out. With the Life Insurance example, you don’t get the tax deduction upfront, but what you do get is the money coming out tax-free! This can be a huge difference in the way of returns. In a traditional 401k, using a 7.5% growth rate (Warren Buffet cited from 1950-2011). That money would’ve grown to $268,000, meaning $10,000 a year for 15 years, $150k worth of contributions, at 7.5% would’ve grown to $268,000. And we show you using that how the money in a traditional 401k would come out. You have to pay taxes on that money so we assume a 25% tax bracket coming out with the 401k, and we notice that over that time of getting income. If we do a 30 year time horizon, you basically are going to pay over $150k in taxes while that money has been coming out of your traditional 401k. With the Life Insurance, again, we don’t get that tax deduction upfront, but we get the tax-free distributions on the back end. What that means is the $150k of taxes that you would’ve paid, you don’t pay that with the Life Insurance. The nice thing too is that as it’s coming out of the Life Insurance, it doesn’t effect your social security taxes. Unfortunately, most people don’t realize that potentially much as 50 to 85% of your social security could be taxed in retirement, depending on how much income they make. With the Life Insurance Retirement Plan, you don’t have that. The other thing is that it doesn’t effect your Medicare B Premiums. The last concept that we talked about with the report is taxes. Where are we currently in taxes? You’re not going to believe this, but we are in the lowest tax environments we’ve been in for the last 70-80 years. Most people feel with a budget out of control and the big deficits that we’re facing that taxes have to go up over the long run, so the argument can be made that deferring today to potentially pay taxes down the road at maybe a higher tax bracket isn’t going to make as much sense as you think it is. So if you think that taxes are going to go up, a Life Insurance Retirement Strategy might make more sense to you. It’s our job to educate you as to what is out there, this might be a piece to a portfolio, there are great reasons to have a 401k like potentially a company match. There’s also great reasons to maybe have some money in a Life Insurance Retirement Strategy.

 

 

**ACCESS THE REPORT HERE**
https://aflinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/AFLI-LIRP.pdf

EMERGENCY CASH FUND

Besides budgeting, debt management, and educating ourselves on “understanding our money,” having an emergency cash fund is the first place to start saving money.  The temptation may be to invest in the stock market,  or invest in your company’s retirement plan–but the emergency fund is arguably the most important piece of getting your finances in order.  An account that is used to stave off unplanned expenses that can often cause financial turmoil. When we have some money put away for a “rainy day” or to handle unexpected financial curve balls, it provides a safety net and peace-of-mind. The money should be readily available and safe to be used specifically for emergencies, i.e. an emergency fund.  How much we put away really depends on us, what we can afford, and what’s sufficient to cover our expenses for a period of time.  A good rule of thumb is to have 3 to 6 months of expenses set aside.   Obviously, if we have unpredictable income, such as commissions, seasonal income, concerns about our employment, a lay-off, or possible job change, then we may want more.  Also, if we are having health concerns or potential needs with other loved ones, consider that as well.  There are no set rules, but the goal is to make the unpredictable expenses more predictable, and feeling less stressed. Ideally, this money should be in a safe, accessible place, such as a savings account, money market, or in 3-month T-Bills.  Most mutual fund companies have a money market option available, but beware of any service fees that may be charged if we don’t maintain a proper account balance.   Unfortunately, there are also many examples where people get into a financial bind, and take a loan from their retirement 401(k) as their emergency fund.  This isn’t what the retirement monies are to be used for, because they can come with potential fees and penalties, income tax consequences and are supposed to be earmarked for long-term retirement needs.
A couple of examples may help further illustrate: If our monthly budget totals roughly $2,100, then we should shoot for having about $6,300 in an emergency fund.  Also, in this same example, let’s say that we have a leaky roof that needs about $1,700 to fix. Then our emergency fund should be $8,000, ($6,300 + $1,700).
As with any saving’s goal, getting started and sticking with it is the best plan for success. Having an emergency fund gives us flexibility and reduces stress.

GOAL SETTING AND SAVING

Many of the topics that we have been discussing play a major role in helping us shape our finances by taking action. However, goal setting and savings are synonymous for various reasons. What we are saving should gel with our financial needs and goals. Goals help set priorities, because most of us don’t know what we are saving for, or how money fits into our life goals.   “Are we trying to build a college fund?” or “Do we want to buy a home?” or “Is planning for our retirement the most important thing?” If we have a sense of what we want to accomplish by saving our money, it helps to focus on what investment ideas can fit with that need (longer term growth or shorter term needs), our time horizons, and how much we need to put away.  Many people may feel that saving money has some value as it relates to happiness. We’ve discussed plenty of examples where having money didn’t equate to happiness.  Balancing priorities, financial goals, savings needs, and life desires, are key ingredients to personal wellbeing. Your life shouldn’t be consumed by the almighty dollar, or lamenting about how things would be better with a higher paying job, or having more money to spend.  One of the acronyms to goal setting involves taking a S-M-A-R-T approach to financial or personal needs.
By setting goals we have focus and a direction– without them we would wander aimlessly.  Imagine trying to throw a dart without a dart board, or building a house without a blueprint.  Some of the many benefits of setting goals include:
1.   Allowing us to stay focused rather than wasting time. 2.  Helping us to measure our progress while we push towards our objective. 3.  Converting dreams and wishes into something that is real. 4.Goals help us to stay motivated; we are excited to accomplish our objective.

CREDIT CARD DEBT

It’s very easy to rely heavily on credit, but remember that the more you charge, the more you owe.  You have to live within your means, and make sure that you are only charging what you can afford to pay back.  Unlike a home mortgage or a car payment, credit cards don’t have a fixed monthly payment that we can plan around.  If you are having to pay a lot of your monthly income to your credit cards, then that should be a warning sign.  Also, the more you charge, the more potential interest you are incurring.  As a rule of thumb, don’t allow your credit card to take up more than 10% of your monthly income.  Additionally, keeping your credit limit low, limiting the number of cards that you have, or using cards that make you pay off the balance every month, like American Express, can help to keep your credit card debt manageable.
Credit scores and credit history are also very important when it comes to debt management.  Our ability to buy a house, get a car loan, qualify for student loans, personal loans, and credit cards are just a few of the many things impacted by credit scores.  The interest rates charged on many things depends on our credit score; the lower the score, the higher the rates.  How we handle our debt has a huge influence on our credit score, so it’s important that we try to follow a few tips:
1. Carrying a lot of debt, especially high credit card debt, hurts our score.  Our level of debt is 30% of our score, so paying the balances quickly or reducing them can help. 2. Late or missed payments hurt your credit scores.  Payment history is 35% of your credit score. 3. Try to keep the revolving debt (credit card, retails cards, gas cards, etc.) below 10% of your total available credit. 4. Taking out loans or keeping credit balances DOES NOT help build credit score. 5. Understand any “enticement” offers, such as charge $5,000 in first 60 days, and we will give you 25,000 reward points.  These cards could be loaded with lots of other costs, such as much higher interest rates, fees for late payments, or rate hikes for over-charging.  Remember, you need to charge to get the offer! 6. Having too many cards creates more temptations to charge more debt, and can become very unmanageable.